Stars at Three

One Date, One Feeling

eatsleepdraw:

A digital illustration of a hand holding a flower. View high resolution

eatsleepdraw:

A digital illustration of a hand holding a flower.

youmightfindyourself:

Here he is. Matches in one hand, petrol bottle in the other. He removes the bottle cap, drops it to the ground and douses himself in liquid. He does everything slowly, methodically, as if it were part of a routine he has practiced for years. Then he stops, looks around, and strikes a match.
At this moment nothing in the world can bridge the gap that separates the self-immolator from the others. His total defiance of the survival and self-preservation instincts, his determination to trample on what everybody else finds precious, the ease with which he seems to dispose of his own life, all these place him not only beyond our capacity of understanding, but also outside of human society. He now inhabits a place that most of us find inhabitable. Yet, from there he does not cease to dominate us.

“As he burned he never moved a muscle, never uttered a sound, his outward composure in sharp contrast to the wailing people around him.”

Journalist David Halberstam describes the death of Thích Quàng Đúc, the Vietnamese Buddhist monk who set himself on fire in Saigon in 1963. The quieter the self-immolator the more agitated those around him. The former may slip into nothingness, but his performance changes the latter’s lives forever. They experience repulsion and attraction, terror and boundless reverence, awe and fear, all at once. Over them he now has the uncanniest form of power.
The experience is so powerful because it is so deeply seated in the human psyche. In front of self-immolation, even the most secularized of us have a glimpse into a primordial experience of the sacred. Originally, the sacred is defined as something set apart, cut off from the rest, which remains profane; what we feel towards such a radically different other is precisely a mix of terror and fascination. Self-immolation is a unique event precisely because it awakens deep layers of our ultimate make-up. In a striking, if disguised fashion, self-immolation occasions the experience of the sacred even in a God-forsaken world like ours. (via)
View high resolution

youmightfindyourself:

Here he is. Matches in one hand, petrol bottle in the other. He removes the bottle cap, drops it to the ground and douses himself in liquid. He does everything slowly, methodically, as if it were part of a routine he has practiced for years. Then he stops, looks around, and strikes a match.

At this moment nothing in the world can bridge the gap that separates the self-immolator from the others. His total defiance of the survival and self-preservation instincts, his determination to trample on what everybody else finds precious, the ease with which he seems to dispose of his own life, all these place him not only beyond our capacity of understanding, but also outside of human society. He now inhabits a place that most of us find inhabitable. Yet, from there he does not cease to dominate us.

“As he burned he never moved a muscle, never uttered a sound, his outward composure in sharp contrast to the wailing people around him.”

Journalist David Halberstam describes the death of Thích Quàng Đúc, the Vietnamese Buddhist monk who set himself on fire in Saigon in 1963. The quieter the self-immolator the more agitated those around him. The former may slip into nothingness, but his performance changes the latter’s lives forever. They experience repulsion and attraction, terror and boundless reverence, awe and fear, all at once. Over them he now has the uncanniest form of power.

The experience is so powerful because it is so deeply seated in the human psyche. In front of self-immolation, even the most secularized of us have a glimpse into a primordial experience of the sacred. Originally, the sacred is defined as something set apart, cut off from the rest, which remains profane; what we feel towards such a radically different other is precisely a mix of terror and fascination. Self-immolation is a unique event precisely because it awakens deep layers of our ultimate make-up. In a striking, if disguised fashion, self-immolation occasions the experience of the sacred even in a God-forsaken world like ours. (via)

(via fielo)

fielo:

Circus in Grozny, Chechnya, 2000 - Jason Eskenazi View high resolution

fielo:

Circus in Grozny, Chechnya, 2000 - Jason Eskenazi

shinya234:

本日は、先月から決まっていた読書サークルの日。
地元のちょっとしっぽりと飲めるBARで、お好みの本なんぞについて
喋り合う会ですね。えー、連日の飲みでわたくしはコンディション
あまりよくなかったのですが、そこは大人の会ですから
徐々に気持いい気分になって、気付けば3時間以上ただ喋るという
読書サークルというより、好きに喋るだけってただの飲み会やん。笑
まー、そんなのどうでもいいんです。とはいえ、読書の会ですから
いろんな作家の名前が出てきておりましたが、今日一番の話題に
なったのは、笹本稜平の「還るべき場所」
これ、読んでない人はぜひ読んでください。一気に読めますから。
哲学もあり、価値観もあり、刹那さもありながらの山岳スペクタル
そして、魅力的な登場人物。
全ての要素が詰まっております。ま、読書好きなら楽しめます。
とにかく今月は仕事にプライベートにと会う人たちが多過ぎて
なかなか本をゆったり読む気になれない状況ではありますが
ま、写真も本も逃げることはないですから。
焦らず、余韻を残しながら、その時を待てばいいのです。
明日は爆睡して、映画観てまったり過ごすとしましょう。
では、また。



View high resolution

shinya234:

本日は、先月から決まっていた読書サークルの日。

地元のちょっとしっぽりと飲めるBARで、お好みの本なんぞについて

喋り合う会ですね。えー、連日の飲みでわたくしはコンディション

あまりよくなかったのですが、そこは大人の会ですから

徐々に気持いい気分になって、気付けば3時間以上ただ喋るという

読書サークルというより、好きに喋るだけってただの飲み会やん。笑

まー、そんなのどうでもいいんです。とはいえ、読書の会ですから

いろんな作家の名前が出てきておりましたが、今日一番の話題に

なったのは、笹本稜平の「還るべき場所」

これ、読んでない人はぜひ読んでください。一気に読めますから。

哲学もあり、価値観もあり、刹那さもありながらの山岳スペクタル

そして、魅力的な登場人物。

全ての要素が詰まっております。ま、読書好きなら楽しめます。

とにかく今月は仕事にプライベートにと会う人たちが多過ぎて

なかなか本をゆったり読む気になれない状況ではありますが

ま、写真も本も逃げることはないですから。

焦らず、余韻を残しながら、その時を待てばいいのです。

明日は爆睡して、映画観てまったり過ごすとしましょう。

では、また。

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